Diversity-Equity-Inclusion

SCC Flyers Working Together…

DUE TO CURRENT HEALTH CONCERNS, OUR MARCH EVENTS ARE CANCELLED.

Building, promoting, and sustaining a culture of excellence delivered through helpfulness and by providing opportunities, maintaining mutual respect, and preserving a commitment to integrity.

For more information, please contact Alfreda Stroman, Dean of Campus Diversity  stromana@sandhills.edu

March 2020 Women’s History Month theme is “Valiant Women of the Vote.” The theme honors “the brave women who fought to win suffrage rights for women, and for the women who continue to fight for the voting rights of others.”  Purple is the internationally recognized color to symbolize women while the combination of the colors green, purple and white is meant to represent women’s equality.

Listed below are some WHM nuggets that may be of interest to you:

Marie Curie is the only woman to ever win two Nobel Prizes. Her first award was for physics for her work on spontaneous radiation with her husband, with her second being in Chemistry for her studies of radioactivity.

Jane Addams was the first woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Because of her work with the Hull House, the public philosopher, writer, leader and suffragist went down as one of the most influential and prolific women in American history.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony spent their lives fighting for women’s suffrage, but neither lived long enough to see the Amendment granting them the right to vote. Stanton passed away in 1902, decades before women finally won out, and Anthony in 1906 only a few years later.

The first woman to rule a country as an elected leader in the modern era was Sirimavo Bandaranaike of Sri Lanka, who was elected as prime minister of the island nation in 1960 and later re-elected in 1970. She is still one of only a handful of female heads of states, though numbers are growing with female leaders being recently elected in places like Brazil, Switzerland, Costa Rice, Lithuania and Gabon.

The first woman to run for U.S. president was Victoria Woodhull, who campaigned for the office in 1872 under the National Woman’s Suffrage Association. While women would not be granted the right to vote by a constitutional amendment for nearly 50 years, there were no laws prohibiting one from running for the chief executive position.

The first female governor of a U.S. state was Wyoming governor Nellie Tayloe Ross, elected in 1924. Wyoming was also the first state to give women the right to vote, enacting women’s suffrage in 1869, making it a surprising leader in women’s rights.

The first country to grant women the right to vote in the modern era was New Zealand in 1893. In this same year, Elizabeth Yates also become major of Onehunga, the first ever female mayor anywhere in the British empire.

Think that factory work was always done by men? In fact, during the 19th century, factory workers were primarily young, single women. Men and married women stayed home to work the farm or manage the house. In 1777, sixteen-year-old Sybil Ludington raced through the night to warn New York patriots that the British were attacking nearby Danbury, CT, where munitions and supplies for the entire region were stored during the heat of the Revolutionary War. While Paul Revere gets all the glory for nighttime rides, her journey took her twice the distance and helped the troops prepare and repel a British attack.

SCC Diversity Committee Members 2019-2020
Associate Professor Madie Ash
Associate Dean Kimberly Blue
Dr. Ryan Book
Professor Sarah Bumgarner
Faculty Secretary Dana Cuellar
AVP Human Resources Wendy Dodson
Student Representative Spencer Dunne
HR Specialist Marina Figueroa
Associate Professor Johnnerlyn Johnson
Dr. Celethia McMillian
Associate Professor William "Bill" Pope
Professor Daniel Regalado
Professor Nevius Toney
Professor Kim Wade
SCC Ethnic Race Demographics    
StudentsFac/Staff
Count% of TotalCount% of Total
Am Ind1363%60.02
Asian531%1less than 1%
Black74116%540.2
Foreign10less than 1%00
Hispanic55212%70.03
Hawaiin/Pac Isl8less than 1%00
Multi Races2034%00
Unknown2235%00
White266258%1960.74
Grand Total4588264
SCC Gender %    
StudentsFac/Staff
Count% of TotalCount% of Total
Female285362%17968%
Males173538%8532%