Student Guide to Math Placement

Beginning in January 2019,  most students will no longer be required to complete a placement test to determine their math placement.

You do not need to complete a placement test to determine your math placement if:

  • You graduated from a US high school (public, private, or home) within the last ten years
  • You took the SAT or ACT test within the last ten years
  • You took a placement test at another college within the last ten years
  • You passed english or math at another college or university
  • You have an associates degree or higher

For more information about whether you need to complete a placement test to determine your math placement, please see http://www.sandhills.edu/admissions/test-exemptions-placement-testing/.

Why am I being put into these math courses?

  • All 58 of North Carolina’s community colleges are changing the way they support entering college students
  • Students are now placed into new, accelerated classes
  • These classes are proven to help students reach their goals faster
  • We call this program RISE (Reinforced Instruction for Student Excellence)

How is this different?

  • Most students take no placement tests
  • Placement is based on unweighted high school GPA, within the last 10 years
    • Students with a GPA of 2.8 or higher  may enroll in the math course required for their degree without any other requirements
    • Students with a GPA between a 2.2 – 2.799 may enroll in the math course required for their degree, but with a mandatory ‘co-requisite’ support course
    • Students with a high school GPA less than a 2.2 will enroll in a mandatory one-semester ‘transition’ math course (MAT 003) and a student success strategies course (ACA 090)

Why is it better?

  • One semester transition courses take the place of two or more semesters of the previous developmental courses
  • Co-requisite courses let students get the extra support they need to be successful in college courses while saving time and money
  • The new approach makes it faster and easier for students to get just the right amount of support they need when they need it
  • This approach has been proven to be better and faster for students, but it is different and different can be confusing – asking the right questions is important!

What should I ask my advisor?

  • Which math class do I need for my degree?
  • Considering my course requirements, do I need to complete a transition math course and what are my options?
  • Which courses count toward my degree?
  • Who can I ask if I have more questions?

 

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