Sandhills Community College
Course Syllabus Guidelines and Template
2012-2013

Guidelines

Course syllabi communicate to students and to faculty the course description, faculty contact information, major course goals that are based upon measurable student learning outcomes, required course materials, grading policies that include assessment methods and grading scale, attendance policies, course schedule, and an overview of college policies and services. The primary purpose of a syllabus is to inform students in a formal and timely manner of the nature and content of the course and the policies and procedures that apply.

The course syllabus reflects the professor's professionalism and the quality of the course. Thus it should be prepared carefully and be clear and concise. The syllabus also is describes the student learning outcomes, an overview of the course content, and the assessments used to evaluate the students' outcomes. At the end of each course, each instructor should be able to explain the following:

  1. Knowledge and skills that students obtained in the course.
  2. Activities students engaged in to develop knowledge and skills.
  3. Methods of assessments used to measure the level at which students developed knowledge and skills.
  4. How the results of assessment were used to improve the educational process.
For more information on writing course or program objectives in terms of student learning outcomes and assessing the outcomes, please go to Course Syllabus Guidelines and Student Learning Outcomes page.

A course syllabus should be given to each student at the beginning of the course. This syllabus becomes the contract between the instructor and student for student learning outcomes, assignments, methods of assessment, and attendance policies. Every semester a copy of each syllabus will be approved by the department chair prior to the first day of the semester and sent to the office of the dean of instruction.

Required Information

Certain information must be included in every syllabus, whether for a classroom, online, or hybrid course. The professor may add information to meet specific course needs, but the information indicated in the template on the next page must be included.

Course Syllabus Template

Please read the explanation of each part of the Course Syllabus Template below. Each required section of the template is followed by examples in text boxes. To create or revise an existing course syllabus to include the required information described below, please download the following template in MS Word:


COURSE DESCRIPTION

The Course Description section of the syllabus includes the following:
  • Course Prefix, Number, and Title   Credit Hours (Contact Hours – Lab Hours)
  • Prerequisites
  • Corequisites
  • Course Description (copied from the Combined Course Library)

ENG 231-N01 American Literature I - Course Syllabus

 COURSE DESCRIPTION

ENG 231 American Literature I       3 credit hours (3 contact hours – 0 lab hours)

Prerequisites: ENG 112, 113, or 114
Corequisites: None

This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.

FACULTY INFORMATION

The Faculty Information section includes the following:

  • Faculty Member's Name (may be preceded with the instructor's earned or preferred title such as Professor Smith, Dr. Smith, Ms. Smith)
  • Office Location
  • Office Hours
  • Telephone Number
  • Email Address

 FACULTY INFORMATION

Professor Tanya Smith

Office Location: 300 Blue Hall

Office Hours: 10:00-10:50 AM, M-F

Telephone: (910) 695-3888

Email: smitht@sandhills.edu

MAJOR COURSE GOALS

All courses should be based upon measurable student learning outcomes. Therefore, the Major Course Goals section lists the learning outcomes that each successful student will have achieved at the end of the course. These goals should be 4-10 broad goals. More specific goals will be listed in the Modules area of the course. Each goal must be written in measurable terms to describe what the student could do when he or she completed the course successfully. General terms such as learned, appreciated, or understood cannot be measured effectively, so they should be replaced by terms that can be measured, such as analyzed, compared, defined, described, and explained. Each bulleted item begins with a capital letter and ends with a period. Note: At the end of each course, each instructor should be able to explain the following:

  1. Knowledge and skills that students obtained in the course.
  2. Activities students engaged in to develop knowledge and skills.
  3. Methods of assessments used to measure the level at which students developed knowledge and skills.
  4. How the results of assessment were used to improve the educational process.
For more information on writing course or program objectives in terms of student learning outcomes and assessing the outcomes, please go to Course Syllabus Guidelines and Student Learning Outcomes.

 MAJOR COURSE GOALS

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will have done the following:

  • Analyzed the poetry, drama, and fiction of early American literature to the Civil War.
  • Identified historical and cultural influences on American literature of the period from its beginnings to 1865.
  • Analyzed the major forms of the period, showing how they are related to earlier and later forms.
  • Composed coherent essays about American literature using textual evidence.
  • Composed a research paper about American literature using primary and secondary sources.

For more specific objectives, please consult the "Module Objectives" in each module folder in the Modules area of the course.

GENERAL EDUCATION

Sandhills Community College requires that the graduates of all degree programs can demonstrate competence in four areas: social and personal responsibility, communication, critical thinking, and technical literacy. You should list the areas where students will show improvement as a result of completing your course successfully, using the phrasing shown below to list the general education areas in your course. At the end of the course, you should be able to describe the methods of assessments used to measure the level at which students developed these general education skills. You should also be able to describe how you used the results of assessment to improve the educational process.

 GENERAL EDUCATION

Students who are successful will improve in the following general education areas: social and personal responsibility, communication, critical thinking and technical literacy.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS

In this section you will list all required and recommended course materials beginning with your textbook if one is required for your course. Please list all required or recommended books by author, title, edition, publisher, date, and ISBN. Be sure to list any additional required or recommended materials such as software.

 

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS

Textbooks

The American Tradition in Literature: Shorter Edition in One Volume. Eds. Perkins and Perkins. 11th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2007. ISBN: 13: 978-0-07-312373-8 (pbk).

You may find other useful print resources including helpful secondary textbooks by clicking the Resources link on the navigation frame.

Recommended Materials

Fowler, H. Ramsey, and Jane Aaron, eds. The Little, Brown Handbook. 10th ed. New York: Addison, Wesley, Longman, 2007. ISBN: 0-321-38951-4. Since your required essays and research paper will use the MLA documentation style, you may want to purchase a copy of The Little, Brown Handbook. The handbook contains examples of essays and research papers written in the required MLA style.

GRADING POLICIES

The Grading Policies section advises students of the assessment methods and grading scale used in the course. The example below describes the types of assignments and their weight, followed by the grading scale for individual assignments. The Blackboard gradebook gives you the ability to place assessments into categories and then to assign weights to the categories. The gradebook also can display the Running Weighted Total so students can see their average grade at any point in the course. The Running Weighted Total can be set to base the current average only on those items that have been completed and graded. The gradebook can also be set to show the due date for each type of assessment.

 GRADING POLICIES

Grading Scale
Your final grade will be based on the following scale:

  • A=100-93
  • B=92-85
  • C=84-77
  • D=76-70
  • F=69-0
Areas of Assessment
Your final course grade will be based upon the following weights for categories of assessments.
  • Discussion forums and weekly course participation 20%
  • Essays 30%
  • Research paper 20%
  • Short quizzes on reading assignments 10%
  • Midterm and final exams 20%

Academic Integrity
In addition to good academic performance, students should exhibit honesty and integrity. If there is any question that academic honesty and integrity are not honored, students may be required to redo assignments in the presence of an instructor-selected monitor. Proof of dishonesty, including plagiarism, will make students subject to disciplinary action. Please see the "SCC Policy Statements" below for more information.

Access/Disability Policy
Please consult the "SCC Policy Statements" below for more information.

ATTENDANCE POLICIES

The Attendance Policies section states the instructor's attendance policies for the course. The example below states the SCC Attendance Policy copied from the General Catalog 2008-2009. You may include all of that information in your course syllabus, but you should modify the second two sentences if you permit a certain number of absences, calculate tardies as an absence, or restrict absences for certain reasons. You may also include this statement for online or hybrid courses: "The state auditor requires that the instructor be able to demonstrate that students are participating in the course on a regular basis."

 ATTENDANCE POLICIES

Because the college realizes that academic success is tied to regular attendance, students are expected to attend all class sessions, laboratories, and clinical experiences. Faculty members are responsible for informing students in writing at the first class meeting of attendance expectations and identifying all classes, laboratories, and clinical experiences which must be attended at the scheduled times. Faculty members will inform students at the first class period if tardiness is to be computed as an absence. Absence from class must be explained satisfactorily to the instructor, and the student is held responsible for all work missed. Unsatisfactory attendance may adversely affect a student's grade for the course. Any student who violates the attendance policy of the course during the first eight weeks (or half-way through a summer session) of the semester may be required to drop the course. Any student who violates the attendance policy of the course during the last eight weeks of the semester may be required to withdraw from the course with a grade of "WP" or "FW," depending upon his or her grade in the course at the time of withdrawal. Class sessions that are missed by late-enrolling students may be counted as absences. Students will not be charged when an absence is due to participation in an activity approved by the dean of instruction or the dean of student services.

COURSE SCHEDULE

This section in the Course Syllabus contains an overview of the Modules of the course arranged by weeks or by days. Whether providing a weekly or a daily schedule, instructors should list due dates of major assignments, including written and oral reports, tests, examinations, and official holidays.

 COURSE SCHEDULE

Hello students! Here is our tentative schedule for the course. For more specific details, consult the Modules area of the course.

  • Module 1: Colonial Literature I, Weeks 1-2. Your first test will be given at the end of the 2nd week.
  • Module 2: Colonial Literature II, Weeks 3-4. Your second test will be given at the end of the 4th week.
  • Module 3: Reason and Revolution I, Weeks 5-6. Your first essay assignment will be due at the end of the second week.
  • Module 4: Reason and Revolution II, Weeks 7-8. Your mid-term exam will be due at the end of the 8th week.
  • Module 5: Romanticism I, Weeks 9-10
  • Module 6: Romanticism II, Weeks 11-13. Your third test will be due at the end of the 13th week.
  • Module 7: Civil War Literature, Weeks 14-15. Your second essay will be due at the end of the 15th week.
  • Review and Final Exam: Week 16. The final exam day and time will be announced during the semester.

SCC POLICY STATEMENTS

This final section in the Course Syllabus contains a summary for students of SCC resources and policies that are required in every syllabus. Note: To make sure that students receive the latest information, you can download a copy of the latest version from the Web and attach that to your syllabus, or you can give the students a link to the URL of the "SCC Policy Statements." If you are teaching an online course in Moodle beginning in spring 2011, a link to the "SCC Policy Statements" will be included in your course. URL: http://www.sandhills.edu/faculty-staff/syllabus/sccpolicystatements.html

 

SANDHILLS COMMUNITY COLLEGE POLICY STATEMENTS

Use the link below to read a summary for students of various policies and services listed in the Sandhills Community College General Catalog: